Content-Driven Classes in an Online Setting

In this post, we are sharing suggestions for how to translate content-driven classes into an online setting. 

Below please find the online alternatives for:

  • Lecture format
  • Demonstration
  • Provocation
  • Illustration
  • Presentation

Suggestions based on technology level*:

Low-Tech

Make a PowerPoint/Sheets/Prezi slide deck of your lecture points. Send your students an email to let them know you’ve posted the presentation on LMS/Google Classroom/Digication and that they should look through it there. Be sure to provide next steps for them: after they’ve looked at it, what should they do next?

Mid-Tech

Post a recording of your lecture (along with any slide deck) on LMS/Google Classroom/Digication so that students are able to interact with the material anytime during your established timeframe. Think of what type of follow-up assignment or interaction would make sense.

High-Tech

Go through your slide deck with your class live using your preferred technology (Big Blue Button, Google Meet) while also recording. Post the recording on LMS/Google Classroom/Digication so that students interact with the material later, if need be. And consider a reflection assignment or ‘take-aways’ as a next step.

 

Synchronous/Asynchronous suggestions – see this presentation.

Considerations/Tips:

  • What will students be asked to do with the lecture or demonstration?
  • What happens after viewing it? Is there a follow-up discussion or assignment?
  • What learning objectives does this practice support?

Technology* you might consider:

  • Power Point
  • Google Slides
  • Kaltura
  • Your Phone or Computer
  • LMS
  • Google Classroom
  • Digication
  • Google Drive
  • Big Blue Button
  • Google Meet
  • And many others…

*Please check the recommended and supported technologies on Pratt’s Telepresence Site.

You might also be interested in:

Additional tech suggestions to help you with content delivery online*.


Note:

 We understand ‘low tech’ as any of the following: 

  1. faculty generally unfamiliar/uncomfortable with technology OR
  2. students generally unfamiliar/uncomfortable with technology OR 
  3. both students and faculty have tech limitations such as internet connectivity, technology access, computer access etc.

We understand ‘high tech’ as any of the following:

  1. faculty and students both familiar with and somewhat more comfortable with technologies AND 
  2. both faculty and students have full access to the internet, technologies and computers/video/audio etc.

We understand mid tech as something in between.

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