William the Hippo

In 1917, The Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired a small ancient Egyptian faience hippopotamus. Created in a captivating blue, the little hippo quickly won people’s hearts. He received his now-famous nickname, William, in 1931, and today he is the informal mascot of the Museum, beloved by museum goers around the world. A weekend of William-related activities is planned for November 17–19. Join a Conversation with a Curator on Friday evening (at 6:30 and 7). All talks meet in Gallery 132, Lila Acheson Wallace Galleries of Egyptian Art, first floor.

 

 

New York Botanical Garden

New York Botanical Garden

 The New York Botanical Garden’s beloved Holiday Train Show might be the one exception to the rule. Every year, visitors queue to watch tiny trains chug down a track lined with 150 plant-based scale models of New York landmarks. This year’s display puts the spotlight on classic Midtown skyscrapers like the Empire State Building and St. Bartholomew’s Church!

 

 

Rockefeller Center

The first Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center went up in 1931, starting a holiday tradition that is still going strong more than eight decades later. This year’s 78-foot, 10-ton Norway Spruce at Rockefeller Center is certainly the biggest Christmas tree in the five boroughs, if not the country.

 

American Museum of Natural History

American Museum of Natural History

Like many New York landmarks, the American Museum of Natural History has its own holiday tree. Instead of glass baubles and colorful ribbons, this 13-foot tree is decorated entirely with paper origami ornaments folded by hand. This year’s tree features models inspired by the new exhibit on the five senses, such as hands, eyes, balancing figures and optical illusions. Volunteers started folding the ornaments (more than 1,000!) in March.

More

https://www.timeout.com/newyork/things-to-do/new-york-attractions-you-have-to-visit-during-the-holidays