Project Third 2021 2020-11-02T16:50:17+00:00

Pratt Fine Arts’ Project Third (P3) 2020 Presents

2020-2021: Decolonial Art Pedagogies

In Fall ‘20 and Spring 21’, P3 will present Decolonial Art Pedagogies, a series of events that propose decolonial, alternative, and radical pedagogical models for education, starting with a focus on Indigenous pedagogies at the intersection with art education, social practice, and performance art. P3 will feature an array of programming focused on Indigenous epistemologies, pedagogies, research, community practice, and performance art via a series of lectures, an artist’s residence, conversations, workshops, performances, and student engagements. 

Decolonial Art Pedagogies was conceived to demonstrate how the recognition and implementation of Indigenous epistemologies and pedagogies may lead to promoting a culture of radical social and political inclusion for Indigenous peoples (and for society at large), a process of developing awareness around Indigenous sovereignty; and demonstrating how performance art and social practice, approached from a pedagogical perspective, may activate social engagement, address social injustice and inequity, and lead to processes of social change on the Pratt campus and beyond.

Decolonial Art Pedagogies is a collaboration between Art and Design Education, Center for Teaching and Learning, Fine Arts, Franklin Furnace Archive, Performance and Performance Studies, and Social Science and Cultural Studies’ The Global South Center.

To view Fall 2020 Workshops click here and to view Events click here

While considering the history of this territory we ask, what constitutes knowledge, knowledge production, and decolonial approaches to pedagogy approached through the lens of an Indigenous framework within Pratt Institute? 

In order to tackle this question, Pratt Fine Arts’ Project Third (P3) and its Institute-wide collaborators seek to introduce decolonial approaches to art education based on Indigenous knowledges, local histories, and histories of settlement that allow for cross-disciplinary dialogue; led by Indigenous artists, academics, and activists. 

By acknowledging Indigenous lands and sovereignty at Pratt and initiating a conversation that thus far remains largely absent at the Institute, we can begin to engage in a self-reflexive process around our pedagogical models and start to implement decolonial approaches to: 

  • diversify our pedagogical approaches;
  • provide institutional support and space for Indigenous cultural producers to create programs involving students, administration, staff, and faculty; 
  • start to diversify Pratt Institute by reaching out to Indigenous student applicants; 
  • eventually hire Indigenous faculty and staff; 
  • promote Indigenous perspectives on land and sustainability that support Pratt’s divestment plan.

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Pratt Project Coordinator
Carlos Motta, Associate Professor, Fine Arts

Pratt Collaborators 

Macarena Gómez-Barris, Chairperson of Social Science and Cultural Studies

Heather Lewis, Professor, Art and Design Education 

Amy Khoshbin, Civic Engagement Fellow, Fine Arts

Ann Messner,  Professor, Fine Arts

Jennifer Miller, Professor, Humanities & Media Studies

Jazmin Pralta, Director, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Jane South, Chairperson of Fine Arts

Judit Török, Director, Pratt’s Center for Teaching and Learning

Martha Wilson, Franklin Furnace Archive 

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Funded by Pratt Strategic Funding (2020-2021)

Photo by Nadia McLaren, OCAD U.