Organized by Grace Farms Foundation and Pratt SOA

Program Description:

Although human rights advocates have begun to raise awareness of the pervasiveness of forced labor in construction projects around the world, the use of raw and composite materials produced by forced labor in the built environment largely continues with impunity.

What is modern slavery? What is an ethical building materials supply chain? Many architects and designers work to ensure a building is sustainably built, but are they also ensuring it is ethically sourced?

This panel will begin to explore how the architecture, construction, and design industries grapple with these questions and how these industries might better use digital models, design-to-construction integration tools, big data, and analytics to ensure ethical building materials supply chains.

Introduction of Design for Freedom
by Sharon Prince, CEO and Founder, Grace Farms Foundation and Dr. Harriet Harriss, Dean of the School of Architecture, Pratt Institute

Phil Bernstein, Associate Dean, YSoA (moderator)
Chris Sharples, Principal, SHoP Architects
Susan Jones, Principal Architect, Atelier Jones
Michael Green, Principal. Michael Green Architecture 

To attend the event, please register AIA CES credits, administered by the School of Continuing and Professional Studies at Pratt Institute, are available for this webinar. If you wish to receive credits, please email

(events@gracefarmsfoundation.org) with your AIA member number. Please note that you must participate in the live webinar to receive credit.

 

The Design for Freedom Report with a contribution from Dean Harriss is available here.

“Of the hundreds of sustainable or green product certifications, few of these certifications encompass social sustainability, failing to understand the inherent interdependencies that exist between social and ecological sustainability. By not incorporating social sustainability concepts such as forced labor into sustainability certification criteria, the measure of human embeddedness is often overlooked.”

Dean Harriet Harriss